Organic mulches

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khabbab
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Organic mulches

Post by khabbab » May 5th, 2011, 12:43 pm

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Muhammad Arif Khan
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Re: Organic mulches

Post by Muhammad Arif Khan » January 25th, 2012, 10:16 am

How many of us use mulch regularly. Those who do, what they find is the best and those who do not, why not?

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Re: Organic mulches

Post by haris.kabir » January 25th, 2012, 11:21 pm

I used mulch yesterday to cover the top inch of my freshly potted Amaryllis bulbs.Though my first experience with mulch, I am expecting it would help retain moisture in soil and provide nutrients for a healthy growth, lets see. Btw I made my own mulch by mixing wood powder(the waste u find around wood cutting machines) with commercial organic fertilizer(kali patti ki khad) and small pieces of bark of some unknown tree. :)

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Re: Organic mulches

Post by Muhammad Arif Khan » January 27th, 2012, 9:29 am

My experience of mulch in Amaryllis bed was;
The roots tend to grow superficially under the mulch instead of going deep down.
The snail population increased a lot.

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Re: Organic mulches

Post by KAMasud » July 22nd, 2012, 2:30 pm

Let me answer my own question. What is mulch:-

"Mulching is a process of inbred fertilization which employs certain decomposed organic materials-- including, but not limited to animal sediment-- to blanket an area in which vegetation is desired. The procedure enriches the soil for stimulated plant development while, at the same time, preventing erosion and decreasing the evaporation of moisture from the ground." Wikipedia.

There are two parts, one the first fertilisation, second erosion and evaporation.

For our average climate which part is operative, the first or the second?

In the north fruit growing area where they dont have much evaporation losses they follow the first. They mulch in August their fruit trees with manure. One to provide nutrients at the most crucial state and two, to provide heat of decomposition to the roots. I also mulch in August my fruit trees and ornamentals for the same reason.

Now to the second part, erosion and water/moisture losses. For that purpose i apply mulch April of coir, stones, sawdust, etc.
In termite free northern countries they apply a mulch of straw but due to termites here we cannot apply mulch of straw.

Now to saw dust. A voice of caution is required here. Sweet woods attract termites. Dont buy saw dust in a undiscriminating manner. Pine wood saw dust due to resins is safe. Neem saw dust is safe. Darreagh saw dust is safe. Kikar Acacia is safe. These are all bitter woods and termites dont go near. So if you want to mulch for the second reason might as well mulch with anti termite saw dust.
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Re: Organic mulches

Post by Muhammad Arif Khan » July 23rd, 2012, 8:56 am

The primery objective of Mulch for me is freedom from weeds. For effective results it has to be2-3 inches thick,the other are its collateral advantages.
I tried dry leaves, the beds looked untidy and slugs loved it.
Rice husk was good but would spread all over by wind.
The wood chips stay in place look good retain moisture but consume Nitrogen while decomposing which is very slow.
I have tried it in my rose bed, so far in 6 months there is no termite infestation I expect some fungal growth during Monsoon lets see

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Re: Organic mulches

Post by khabbab » July 23rd, 2012, 3:44 pm

I use coco peat and leaf mold mix as summer mulch, so far so good.
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Re: Organic mulches

Post by Muhammad Arif Khan » July 24th, 2012, 8:31 am

khabbab wrote:I use coco peat and leaf mold mix as summer mulch, so far so good.
In beds or in pots?

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Re: Organic mulches

Post by khabbab » July 24th, 2012, 9:51 am

Muhammad Arif Khan wrote:
khabbab wrote:I use coco peat and leaf mold mix as summer mulch, so far so good.
In beds or in pots?
|n my soil bed. Mulch is best applied in dry form upon the wet soil. So in rainy season i just pour this mixture all over in my soil bed, instant food for worms :) Hence more air in the soil as the worms make air tunnels inside the soil.
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Re: Organic mulches

Post by aykhan » July 24th, 2012, 12:58 pm

I mulched my rose beds in May with leaf mold. When wet it actually looks good. Weeds are few and easily pulled out. Also there are probably several thousand earthworms now since I see their tell tale signs in the beds. In December mulching roses with manure is good since it gives the heat.
If cheap colored wood mulch was available here as it is in the US I would be using it for the beauty and water retention purposes.

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